Benefits payments and abuse

Benefits payments are not just made to lazy cheats who refuse to work. For some, benefits can mean the difference between barely managing to survive and suicide.

Before the new Pope was inaugurated media headlines seemed full of stories about children who were sexually abused by priests. Of course, priests aren’t the only abusers and sexual abuse isn’t the only way in which children are damaged. Physical and emotional abuse take their toll. And abuse is far more prevalent than we like to admit.

Disability isn’t restricted to physical damage and deformity. One the most depressing aspect of abuse is that abused children often become socially withdrawn adults incapable of living a normal life; abuse can result in apparently normal people being unable to function within society because of their experiences.

Some are so damaged that they find it impossible to trust anyone. They cannot work, they cannot join clubs or societies. They survive by isolating themselves from society, some receiving therapy, some surviving by their own devices because therapy has been unable to help them.

Some can be seen shuffling down the road, unwashed, unkempt. Some manage to keep themselves clean and tidy but as soon as they are faced with having to interact with other people immediately withdraw into their shells.

Of course, some victims can put their abuse behind them and function normally. They can hold down a job, maintain relationships, have families and bring up their own children. Others cannot. For them, benefits aren’t a lifestyle; they are necessary for their very survival.

By lumping everyone on benefits as shirkers, by labelling abuse victims as benefits cheats, politicians like David Cameron and Iain Duncan Smith are causing the suffering of abuse victims to continue, indeed to become far worse. Ans all those who are jumping on the bandwagon and ranting that they shouldn’t have to pay benefits from their taxes are just as culpable, just as guilty as those who committed the original abuse.

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Hospital limits number of patients seen in A & E

Hospital limits number of patients seen in A & E

From BBC News:

“The number of patients admitted to an east London hospital A&E unit is to be capped at busy times to improve care.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) said the A&E department at Queen’s Hospital, Romford, was providing patients with “unacceptably poor care”.

It comes after inspectors found some A&E patients had to wait up to 11 hours before being transferred to a ward.”

This appalling decision is the result of so many patients visiting Accident and Emergency Departments and while this decision has been made by a hospital in Romford, it could apply to any hospital within the UK.

There have been many calls for patients to visit their own GPs rather than attending hospital but still patients pour into A&E departments in their droves. Why?

One reason must be that the out of hours GP service is so derisory. Patients are visited by doctors who speak little English or who just do not care. I have had the misfortune of needing to call the out-of-hours service on a Friday evening only to be told that I should see my GP on Monday. The next day I collapsed, an ambulance took me straight to hospital and surgeons performed an operation on the Sunday. My family could have saved me time and much agony by calling for an ambulance in the first instance.

It seems that some practising GPs sign on as out-of-hours locums because they can gain a significant amount of extra pay. I know of one GP who chose to give up his practice because he could take home more as an out-of-hours locum. Now, GPs are hardly paid a pittance; they are highly paid yet do no work at nights or at weekends, unless they have signed up for an out-of-hours service.

Sure, doctors train for many years and are expected to make life and death decisions but in my experience UK doctors can miss simple diagnoses that American doctors dare not because they would be sued for millions of dollars. Yet in the UK, the government is continually attempting to further restrict compensation payments rather than improve patient care.

The result of this incompetence on the part of successive governments is that hospital A&E departments are bearing the brunt and will be further forced to restrict the numbers of patients seen. Somehow, I cannot imagine Margaret Thatcher allowing a situation like this to continue. Much as I disliked Thatcher’s policies, she handbagged doctors and forced them to ensure the service to patients improved considerably. It has since deteriorated badly. We no longer have any politicians capable of performing a similar feat. Conviction politics has died and we are left with mediocre tinkerers. And we are all the poorer for it.

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